Bikes and looking for Gary….or at least his spirit…

by admin
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaI5IRuS2aE[/youtube]

Sometimes I see something creative and inspiring and I have to talk to the person who made it, wore it, put it out there for us. And people are so kind about sharing why…how….. Like Gary, when he told me about his beautiful handmade bike bags.

This is Gary smiling in front of the Delano McDonald’s, where the 21st c. cowboys hang out.

And I think I have sometimes called Gary homeless, just to identify, but Gary isn’t homeless at all.  Because Gary knows more than anyone that this land was made for you and me and he. 

Gary’s outlook on life seemed like a great way to start Monday morning. And, since the days are getting shorter, you might see him.  He’ll be heading from Jackson Hole back down south and maybe hangin’ for a while in Wichita. So, I wanted to alert you to look for him.

We may have met him before and we’ll certainly meet him again. He is a pleasure…

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31x1hYntyKk[/youtube]

And, given all the negative stuff we see about our country sometimes, I feel his outlook is refreshing. Gary takes the things I complicate, and makes me realize how complicated we can make our lives.

I would expect that riding on a bike across the countryside throughout the year is a pretty good way to see how beautiful America really is. Here is Gary, whittling it down to the essence…

 

 

 

Taking my Pony on my Boat: what I share with Zeb Pike.

by admin

Me and my Pony on my boat on the High Plains.

What I share with Zeb Pike.

I do have a few things in common with Zebulon Pike.

I climb the mountains to my West.

I speak French which I use in the West.

As was his, my father was in the military, or at least in the Marines Corps.

And, I beat the trails through Northern New Mexico quite often. This is where Pike was encamped when he was captured by Spanish authorities and taken to Santa Fe. 

I, too, am captured in New Mexico by Santa Fe.

By the art and culture and landscape I need to nourish me on the Plains, so as to be refreshed again with its beauty when I return.

And I am also an explorer of the High Plains that records with maps, drawings, pictures, people’s stories, history and research.

So I understand now that this shadow at right in yesterday’s picture, made  from the clear photo corner that was holding another picture, that is me exploring the High Plains by sea.

When I did sail at camp, about all I could do well was to trim the jib. And that’s maybe all I will ever really take part in in regard to making money off land in the High Plains; to be the crewsman, cook the meals, drive. To suit up and be there.

The XIT Yacht

When I sail on this boat, it is isolated with a skilled crew, but I am somewhat of a stowaway who serves up the chow.  I do share in my own way what I can, sometimes having them yacht, but often with others not on board. Not just sharing of the ranch but of other ranches, through drawings and photographs and writing about ranching in Kansas.  Or in other ways like preserving a Depot that used to ship cattle or having folk artists to a one-room school near my house and inviting everyone around to come see, hear the music, and bring their fiddles.

Or by inviting the real Frenchman in Kansas down for dinner and into the schoolroom to parlez with the pupils. Or having the paleontologists from Kentucky and their European interns down for dinner where I got to parlez with Sophie, the French student. I do what I love, just as those do in their jobs on the XIT Yacht. 

I do the work on the boat that I know how to do, that I did halfway well with what I’d been given, where I think I’m giving back.

Sometimes when I would return to the main dock, I would do something stupid like let go of the main halyard. This only needs to be learned once. And sometimes I need to find a different dock. 

But mostly what I enjoy on the High Plains, is sailing and seeing at sea.

Sometimes it is when I am running…

A bit of it was in the pastures where I would fish for lost cattle. I didn’t always know where to look and it seemed like I never found them. But I could feel something, maybe someone saying follow me…and I will make you fishers of men…

For a lot of my time I had on the High Plains, I had the blessing and curse of taking my pony on my boat. I was probably not as useful as I could have been on the XIT Yacht, but there many people on that boat, and it just seemed so crowded it might sink. So, I lightened the load, my load…

In my books, my degrees, my work in design or preservation, in my car driving miles, in my art, I could get lost on the ocean. But, I would always be guided safely home, wherever that was for the night…Lawrence, Kansas City, Wichita, the XIT Headquarters, Santa Fe, or a hotel in a small town in Kansas when doing historical research in the field.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AW43IKuxOJM&feature=related[/youtube]

a Lone Ranger note: I like this song, but I take issue with the one line that pits Tonto and the Lone Ranger as enemies. I feel it is a contemporary translation that lacks depth in understanding the actual details of the history of its writers. Their intent was to illustrate the common values of an Indian and a White man, to do good, and a friendship that united the pair. They worked alongside each other as practically equal partners, and had each saved the other from death at different points in their lives. 

Tonto’s character was originally a Potawatomi Indian by choice of the radio station owner who was from Michigan. This was a non-native to the area where he rode in Texas and the clothing is inaccurate. But, ‘Tonto’ in Potawatomi means “Wild One” and was mistaken as the Spanish word meaning fool or dumb. And, Tonto called the Lone Ranger “Kemo Sabe”, “trusted servant.” They worked the High Plains together, and would have been on the same boat. 

So yesterday, when I started with Zeb, I went on my sailboat journey of maps and google and Walter Webb’s Great Plains and my Master’s Thesis to try to take what I’d read and done before and make it into something short, edited and tangible. But, instead I realize I took my pony on my boat and we just enjoyed the day.

We sailed

  • through geological and rock formations, surface etching of the High Plains with rivers, glaciers, erosion. 
  • I read about Lewis & Clark and re-read the Charles Kimball Lecture, “It’s all about Eating: Kansas City’s history and opportunity.”
  • I did a timeline of government policies and actions within the 200 year span from Pike’s quote and today that were specific to the Great Plains. 
  • I even added in a tangential timeline of modes of production (technologies) and modes of transportation in relation to phases of Farming in America, but again, focused on my region, The Great American Desert. 
  • And I recorded my journey, over some familiar waters at sea, with my pony on my boat. 

I still do this almost every day and accept that this was the way I was made.

And just sometimes it works. I zigzag back and forth at sea and occasionally hit my mark, reach the point.

At other times I don’t really know where I went or where I was headed, but I did have kind of a plan, just like we did with America when Zeb was sent out to explore. 

And I always enjoy the journey, and record it in my memory or in some other way to preserve. I take that with me, and I leave some behind for the next guy, to do with as he pleases. 

This is Paula, Explorer of the High Plains.


Exploration: Sailing with Paula and Zebulon Pike.

by admin

Sailing away on the Cimarron River uplands...

From where did the sailboat begin it’s journey today?

My daughter posted on this picture and I noticed that the photograph I’d scanned from my album still had clear corners at the right.  I use the old school corners and Webway albums and layer my pictures for space and artistic effect, photos only, no stickers, it’s a once a year event. I organize for a day, then do Jack’s, Lacy’s, Family. Then I store any good extras in labeled manila envelopes. It’s all a mess since I’ve ripped into them with this website and blog.

But, I saw this sailboat in the picture that I have now outlined with a pen. And I realized that there are all kinds of explorers of the High Plains so I set off to sail…

But from these immense prairies may arise one great advantage to the United States, the restriction of our population to some certain limits, and thereby a continuation of the union. Our citizens being so prone to rambling, and extending themselves on the frontiers, will, through necessity, be constrained to limit their extent on the west to the borders of the Missouri and the Mississippi, while they leave the prairies, incapable of cultivation, to the wandering and uncivilized Aborigines of the country.

-Zebulon Pike, 1811.

And, it is the 200 year anniversary from when Zeb Pike made this statement.

Zeb Pike, a pretty good-looking guy.

Well, Zeb’s prediction that we would only settle east of the Missouri didn’t really pan out. Zebulon Pike did exploratory travels through the western territories of North America. These travels included a voyage from St. Louis on the Mississippi to it’s source, a journey through the interior of Louisiana, and the north-eastern provinces of New Spain. This was in 1805, 1806, and 1807 by order of the Government of the United States.

Expeditions of New Spain by Zebulon Montgomery Pike.

Pike vis-a-vis Lewis and Clark.

Being from Kansas City, Lewis and Clark always came to mind and their lookout point around 12th St. downtown. And, Pike was overshadowed by Lewis and Clark. But, their journals are of no value to any study of the Great Plains.  Jefferson had appointed Lewis, a military man and Jefferson’s private secretary, who was also a fellow Virginian. Lewis wisely chose Clark, another military man who was the people guy, able to communicate and rally all kinds, from all backgrounds, and of all levels of education. And, he was a brilliant cartographer. But they went by water and were of eastern orientation, so they saw little of the Plains. This is not to diminish that Kansas City is the real Gateway to the West and it just now growing into its history as a food capital of the world, for it all works together.

Who had more work and fun?

After living on the Missouri River, on the High Plains, and having climbed a few mountains, Pike’s journey is the one I would have chosen. He had the more physically challenging and foreign work. The Great American Desert and the Mountains were absolutely that to Americans who migrated from Europe and settled in the East. And, as it is for all of us who look west, this journey is very exhilarating because it is rugged, dramatic, and difficult.

Pike’s Plains Expedition

Pike’s Plains expedition began July 15,1806 in St. Louis with 23 white men and 51 Indians. By Aug. 26, he abandoned his boat on the Kansas River and went onward with horses purchased from the Indians. And he was captured and conducted to Santa Fe March 3, 1807.

This was the conversation:

Governor:  Do you speak French?

Pike:  Yes, sir.

Governor:  You come to reconnoiter our country, do you?

Pike:  I marched to reconnoiter our own.

Governor:  In what character are you?

Pike:  In my proper character, an officer of the United States Army.

So what’s the point about Pike?

My point is that we did it.  We took the United States. This is not a value judgment on who and why and from whom and strategy of what is good or what is bad or what is sustainable and for how long. It is on a country that studies a bit, makes a plan, does it. Be it good or be it bad, in the U.S. we got $h!t done and stepped up to the plate on how fast the world was moving and took action.

And, if we hadn’t done it, or done it this way, there would have been someone else who would have. First in line, first in time in America was the open-minded people who really saw it and accepted it for what it was.

This included all kinds:  colonists sick of the King, indentured servants, starving immigrants, entrepreneurs with European capital from home, businessmen, and those wanting religious freedom. Good people.

That is us and I’m glad we did it, imperfect as it was and is. Because the world doesn’t stop and sometimes to you have to act, to get the reins, to plow forward and do and make it better later. And that, is what I believe, is the spirit of America.

And I share a few things with Zebulon Pike. I am also an explorer of the High Plains. But that is tomorrow.

What I share with Zeb Pike.

I do have a few things in common with Zebulon Pike.

I climb the mountains to my West.

I speak French which I use in the West.

And, I beat the trail to Santa Fe where I am captured, as he was. But by the art and culture I need to nourish me on the Plains and so as to be refreshed again with its beauty when I return.

And I understand now this shadow in the picture  from the corner holding another picture, that my exploring is by sea.

Sometimes when I am at sea, I am beaten by winds. Then, I know exactly what to do to get back home safely.

When I did sail, about all I could do well was to trim the jib. And that’s maybe all I will ever know about really making money off land in the High Plains, to be the crewsman, cook the meals, drive. To suit up and be there.

But in that private life and world of the XIT Ranch, where I lived on the High Plains, I shared in my own way what I could not just of the ranch but of other ranches, through drawings and photographs and writing about ranching in Kansas.  And I shared by doing things like working on designs to preserve a Depot from where they used to ship cattle, or writing a grant to fund the work, or raising the money to help pay for it. And by inviting the Frenchman in Kansas or the paleontologists from Kentucky down for dinner. I did the work on the boat that I knew how to do, that I did well, where I think gave back.

Sometimes when I would return to the dock, I would do something stupid like let go of the main halyard. This only needs to be learned once. And sometimes I needed to find a different dock. 

But mostly what I enjoy on the High Plains, is sailing and seeing at sea.

Some of it was on foot while running.

A bit of it was in the pastures when I would fish for lost cattle. And I didn’t always know where to look and it seemed like I never found them. But I could feel something, maybe someone saying follow me…and I will make you fishers of men…

For a lot of my time I had on the High Plains, I had the blessing and curse of taking my pony on my boat. I was probably not as useful as I could have been on the ranch, but there were so, so many people on that land, and it just seemed so crowded.

In my books, my degrees, my work in design or preservation, in my car driving miles, in my art, I could get lost on the ocean, but I would always be guided safely home, wherever that was for the night…Lawrence, Kansas City, Wichita, the XIT Headquarters, Santa Fe, or a hotel when doing history work in Kansas. 

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AW43IKuxOJM&feature=related[/youtube]

a note: I like this song, but I don’t think Tonto would call the Lone Ranger “Kemo Sabe” and not want him on his boat. They worked the High Plains together with the same values.

So today, when I started with Zeb, I went on a journey of maps and google and Walter Webb’s Great Plains and my Master’s Thesis to try to take what I’d read and done before and make it into something short, edited and tangible. But, instead I took my pony on my boat and we just enjoyed the day.

It took me through geological and rock formations, surface etching of the High Plains with rivers, glaciers, erosion. I did a timeline of government policies and actions within the 200 year span from Pike’s quote and today that were specific to the Great Plains. I even added in a tangential timeline of modes of production (technologies) and modes of transportation in relation to phases of Farming in America, but again, focused on my region, The Great American Desert. And I recorded my journey, over some familiar waters at sea, with my pony on my boat. 

I still do this almost every day and accept that this was the way I was made. And just sometimes it works. I zigzag back and forth at sea and occasionally hit my mark, reach the point. At other times I don’t really know where I went or where I was headed, but I did have kind of a plan, just like we did with America. And I always enjoy the journey, and record it in my memory or in some other way to preserve. I take that with me, and I leave some behind for the next guy to do as he pleases with it. 

This is Paula the Explorer.

 

 

 

 

le sketch du jour: le musée des arts décoratifs and the senses of place.

by admin

107 rue de Rivoli, my school summer of '80

This is the Museum of Decorative Arts.  This is where I studied the history of bone china, boulle cabinets, tapestries, French armchairs, silver, and every functional yet decorative piece imaginable with which we trap ourselves today :).

I learned about

things and stuff and who used what and why

and how all the low influenced the high.  And vice versa. 

It is the north wing of the Louvre and is entered from Rue de Rivoli. The Rue de Rivoli is a famous shopping street running through Paris that was cut into the city by Napoleon and was named after his early victory against the Austrian army, the battle of Rivoli, fought in 1797.

It cut into the area on the north side of the Louvre and the Tuileries Gardens, but a bit of history on these two places that everyone visits on vacation.

The Louvre

The Louvre’s beginnings were as a fortress to Philip II in the 12th century.  It became a palace during the Middle Ages serving numerous Kings, but it was François Premier who decided the Louvre would house his art collection.  All the while, the Louvre continued to grow in size as a palace. It is only after Louis XIV chose Versailles as his residence in 1682, that constructions on the palace slowed. But this move to the country then allowed the Louvre to be used to house artists. Later the academy of painting and sculpture resided in the Louvre where salons were held to exhibit works and they would remain there for a hundred years.

In 174,7 there was a call for display of the Royal Collection and proposals for a public gallery. And under Louis XVI, le Roi du Soleil, the Royal Museum Concept officially became policy.

Thus, private art for the public domain began in France.

The Tuileries

The Tuileries Gardens were part of the Tuileries Palace that was named for the former tileworks that resided on this land in Paris just west of the Louvre. As will sometimes happen, after the death of Henry II of France in 1559, his widow Catherine de’Medici planned a new palace. Her architect was Philibert de l’Orme but André le Nôtre did not begin the formal gardens and parterres until the reign on Louis XIV in 1664. As he and later Louis’s soon departed, this left the lovely palace abandoned, to be used only as a theater, and the gardens because a fashionable spot for Parisians.

So full circle, when Napoleon cut this swath through the city with the rue de Rivoli, it was a transitional compromise between an urbanism of prestige monuments and aristocratic squares and the forms of modern town planning by official regulation. This included the arcaded shopping streets of the rue de Rivoli, retail ground floor always and ideally covered.

And, before Haussmann and all the later work by Parisian urban planners to make Paris the city of avenues, public monuments, squares, cafés, churches, shops, and vistas in every direction, this place began as a lookout spot.

It was a new center of Paris for the Middle Ages, built above and close to its earlier history of Roman catacombs and before that tribes of Gauls and before that…

It began with a fortress and a field. And it brought together, if not the King and his subjects, his art and his beauty to share and mix with the beauty and culture of the real people.

And, I think this was a pretty good idea. The building, evolving and partial planning of a city that bring a true feeling of ownership to all who are lucky enough to have this experience which can be anywhere.

We all have it when we see it, taste it, smell it, touch it; the senses of place.

 

 

Tuyet, can you alter these shoes? 15 reasons why I KNOW you can do it.

by admin

Navy Blue suede Chie Mihara shoes at Brick's, Wichita.

This is a fabulous pair of shoes.

It would be naughty with all the new navy blues this fall…

provocative with a provençal yellow accent…

Kansas indigenous with indigo jeans, and I can go on, but I won’t.

I want them for all these things and for the new navy blue frock, whose pleat alteration looks divine I might add.

And, Lacy needs my clothes and shoes as well as her own this September and October. So, my feet will have nothing to wear.

Tuyet, I know you can do it. We’ve tried the heel huggers and the pads and the inserts, but the 6 and a half just does not fit. Genevieve called New York to see if any of their other customers in the US had ordered these shoes in the navy blue. Genevieve is way to far ahead, everyone else in the country ordered black. So, a size six simply does not exist or I would have them now. 

And Tuyet, they only sent a 6.5. It’s not like I didn’t see them right away and some size six got in ahead of me in Wichita. I did not procrastinate.

And… you altered both my bathing suit from Von Maur and the Mossino two-piece from Target with such grace understanding the issues as a fellow petite miss.

And plus, you always take in my tank torsos that bunch at the tops of things when I can’t buy the XS or petite.

And 10., the vintage Nicole Miller dress from Wells Street that I wore to the BOTAR BAll 50th!  It’s stunning at tea length, recycled anew to wear again for the 65th BOTAR gala. Your boning at the bodice will be bondé de bosom, so I know you have structural architecture down and can handle this project.

And, the custom fit of those faded 4 year old banana republic bermudas looked fabulous for the cocktail fête with the salmon ruffled silk I purchased. Genevieve is always so nice about that, buy one, alter two.

And Tuyet, you know I’ll never quit researching and so often-times buying that perfect timeless piece from Genevieve. So, I feel I am, at least, a decent customer if one deducts all the professional shopping therapy time and consultation.  

And anyway, I hardly think Genevieve is even aware of the extent of our relationship. She’s always so busy working and being so lovely to everyone. I’m sure she doesn’t even notice all that you do for me, she can hardly find time to have that baby next week.

And, it’s not like I’ve been bringing in my brassieres or pajamas or anything silly like that. It’s only outerwear with which I bother you. Which reminds me, my nike running skirt could really use an inch out of the back waist.

And last, Mike at the Rusty Nail Saddle Shop in Meade has always handled my boots for the calf reduction. So think of all the work he has saved you. I just didn’t think he was the right person for this task.

So Tuyet, can you pretty puh..leeeze… alter this pair of shoes. I know you can do it.

This is my friend ,Tuyet, in her beautiful workshop with all of the beautiful spools of thread.

Smiling darling Tuyet in green and purple.

Paula

FYI:  shoes available at Brick’s, Wichita in Bradley Fair. Don’t miss out, they are the only blue suede Chie Mihara like this custom ordered in the country. Ask for Genevieve, Toni, Marilyn, Gail, Erin or really, anyone. A real team of experts.

 

 

A moment’s pause from gems from the young gals…State Line: Yoga and Hi Hat and Ted.

by admin

I was late to arrive at Yoga Fix at the bottom of the Reece Nichols Building in Mission Woods. I’m an out-of-towner so I always want to respect each neighborhood’s protocol. I had experienced that Bikram on 39th locked the doors and people are advised to arrived 15 minutes early. Never going to happen. But, I was still a minute late and my mat was 200 miles away in Wichita. So, I whipped out my card and asked if I could borrow one and pay after class so that I would not further disrupt.

So into my hot [ter than hell] yoga went I….

My child’s pose was endearing.

My wheel was spinning round and round…

My pigeon cooed…

My crow cackled with glee!

My prayer pose brought thankful thoughts…

shh….shh….shh….shh….

shh.shh.shh.shh.shh.

My Shavasana (corpse pose) always lacks a little. Time enough for that when I’m dead. I’m out of the door.

Forgetting about the dollar I owed, the woman stopped me, “Are you Paula Adams?” she said.

“Yes.”

“There’s a post-it here about the mat rental.”

I pay the dollar and ask, “how did you know it was me?”

“The last girl left a description.”  Of course, I had to look at the post-it.

It said:

Paula Adams

Slender white-haired senior

owes $1 for her mat

Well, I was feeling so fit and alive but it did put a bit of a crimp in my happy baby.

So, onto Hi Hat to grab my mocha and pain au chocolat (post yoga, max chocolate, must get all the endorphins going).

And, saw these handsome gentlemen holding court in the 9 x 9 space that T. Jensen has allowed for those choosing to sit inside (it is brisk February).

Men's Morning Coffee at T. Jensen's place. See what I mean about the size? It's an old cottage-style brick gas station. FB has identified far left as Dorcy Troutman.

 

I’m looking and feeling a little a little low and they kindly struck up a conversation as I waited for the decaf mocha. At this point in time, I didn’t wear lipstick or mascara to work out and the ballcap was on. I’ve now changed my tune on that.

I think there was some kindly remark about working out, so I had to show them the post-it that I had kept.  And the man at the right offered his story.

Trop de Testosterone Ted and his buddy at left.

It went something like this…

“I was on a golfing trip with some guys in [some exotic place or well-known course or something, don’t play golf, don’t remember these things]. An attractive younger woman was talking with my friends and asked who they were here with.  They gestured to me. I overheard her say, “that short bald guy over there?”

I said, “too much testosterone?” His friends said, “hmmm…it’s a gift.”

So, Too Much Testosterone Ted, keep it up.  I think we’re all lookin’ good.

And, for the record, a senior is when one reaches 50 so  I was, at that time, indeed 50 for a few more days. So, it doesn’t bother me so much. It just doesn’t seem like this should still be the term, though, until we get some good stuff like discounts on movies and airline tickets. 

August 29, 2011. A text from Lace…

by admin

Text I rec’d at 12:15 today….  [and I was on a roll…crossfit at 5, home washing face at 7, at desk ever since…the joys of having adult children]

“Mom-try to check your email whenever you have the chance!”

This was the email I looked at at 1:45 pm, since we’d had a boundary talk about communication.  I was trying not to drop everything in an effort to mirror availability when contacting one another…you know…two weeks adult child = two hrs. mom.
From: Lacy Adams <lacyameliaadams@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: Grey shift dress and shoes
Date: August 29, 2011 11:13:05 AM CDT
To: Paula Adams <paulagravesadams@gmail.com>

“I didn’t realize it was so soon – but we have our first party (the Botar Buffet) this Thursday where we meet our escorts. This is the party that is the Kentucky Derby theme – I need to figure out what I’m going to wear!!!”
– Lacy Adams

text to Lacy at 2:08 pm…

Lace sorry to text [this as an aside, not in text…I’m trying to be on-the-text-wagon but the company I keep is making it difficult…] but I’m on it with Genevieve with hat dress and shoes. U r not obligated! I had fun but I’ll send you pics in a bit. luv mom.

email to Lacy…2:35 pm…on the way out of the door to Towne East in Wichita. 

From: Paula Adams <paulagravesadams@gmail.com>

Subject: Derby attire

Date: August 29, 2011 2:36 PM CDT

To: Lacy Adams <lacyameliaadams@gmail.com>

I’m checking Von Maur. There is one possibility that might be good for someone smaller. As the Derby is a summer event, the summer hats most like this have all been sent back. I will send you pictures as soon as possible with some ideas and will be in KC Wed. night to deliver to you as I am driving in from Wichita for the Parents Cocktail Party. I also am hoping that this FB post might gather some other mothers or women in for the challenge! We can do it! Nothing better than feeling needed :). I hope you think this is funny. love, mom.

[I posted this and photo below to FB, hoping for faster communication and some tips from other women. It seems to be a genetic thing in our family to communicate through social media as fastest medium]

googled "Kentucky Derby Hats" and saw this as an option...

3:00 pm, Facebook post from Julayne Ramsey appeared on my wall….so sweet and so” other mother” not to disappoint…

“this is not the best photo…it was taken in the mid 90’s some work deal…But I was showing off my hat…..too bad I don’t have it anymore…I was reading your post and found this.”

 

Aug. 29, 2011 3:02 pm…

Text to Genevieve at Brick’s, Wichita:   This is felt and 78. Something someone (who?) would potentially wear again who wears hats. Not us…

[Toni, Genevieve, Marilyn and Gail are the team of stylists for the Adams women who know all the available clothes and shoes better than I do as I have bought everything here for the last 6 years and keep it all forever. It is all timeless. Genevieve Gordon’s family owned Brick’s in downtown Wichita back in the day. She lets me borrow her purses and hats.]

The felt one someone might wear again, $78. Dillard’s.

Aug. 29, 3:04 pm…

Text to Genevieve:

 this one kind of dull slick like microfiber and to me looks most like the derby hats online that were the alternative to the big brim one side up and one side down. It is $108 which is way more than I want to spend. But since Derby is over, I can’t be picky. I guess someone might go to another Derby party in their lifetime or the actual Derby?

the most like the Derby Hats online…or I thought…looks like something from Alice in Wonderland in this picture…

Aug. 29, 3:06 pm…

Text to Genevieve:

This one has a slight flip up at the edge like two inches (curved up) and the curve is very structured plus the flat top slants so it’s just quite the combo. In the last one the bow is almost just like a free loop of structured satin, and kind of freely more artful tack with a few wispy feathers. so my gut is with that but you know, not I. TY so much for the Chin luu suggestion that I have that is perfect. What shoes?

Aug. 29, 3:08 pm.

Text to Paula from Genevieve and Toni:

We like the first one the best!

Aug. 29, 3:12 pm.

Brringg…brrinnggg..!!!….Call from Genevieve to I-phone (who is 3 weeks from delivering and not working today by the way….I hope I don’t have to bother her in labor…)

Genevieve to Paula: Yes, the first black felt one is the best.

Paula to Genevieve: Okay, I’m heading to Von Maur. Will send you the last picture in a minute.

Aug. 29, 3:18 pm.

Text to Genevieve: This is not a great pic may try for another but have to sneak.

self-photo at Von Maur with Cosy helping me…ssshhh..illegal photo and they are very strict about this, I’ve tried before…Cosy could be fired.

Text from Genevieve in team effort with Toni:  We like this one the best!

Aug. 29, 3:25 pm. Punishing them for good behavior…

Text to Genevieve:

What shoes? I’m wearing the French whore shoes (the pink and black patent platforms with cutouts) so I could just leave those up there except maybe inconvenient since I can’t take off until 9pm and I have to drive back, so if you have another idea that is good, too. TY so much for checking on the navy blue suede Chi Mihara shoes and for getting the cocktail party shorts done. Takes a village of women….

And here’s the finale, the email pièce de résistance….(since most recent at top, read from bottom up).

Sent from my iPhone
Begin forwarded message:
From: Lacy Adams <lacyameliaadams@gmail.com>
Date: August 29, 2011 4:36:50 PM CDT
To: Paula Adams <paulagravesadams@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: Derby party.
Hi mom,
So when is your cocktail party?? I just found out this derby party was THIS Thursday. Is yours this Wednesday night?
Mom – this is the cutest pic though. So cute. Oh my goodness I love it. You’re so lucky that you know Genevieve and all of these ladies to give you such good fashion advice… I seriously just LOVE THIS!!!!!!!!
Well, I’m driving back to Lawrence tonight – but Tuesday night and Thursday night for sure I’m staying at Sara Liechti’s (her address is – 4949 Wornall Road)
I love you a lot & I’m thinking of you. I can’t get over how cute this pic is!!!!!! How expensive was the hat? Seriously for all of these dresses that you’ve let me wear and dresses that you have purchased for me – if you feel that you want any reimbursement just let me know. Seriously.
xoxo, Lace
On Mon, Aug 29, 2011 at 4:09 PM, Paula Adams <paulagravesadams@gmail.com> wrote:

The final 'fit for the 'ffair.

I checked out three hats at dillards which i hate which were expensive and all kind if over the top and sent to Genevieve at bricks and posed the challenge.

Then to Von maur for last option to see cody who had described this tasteful peau de soie with a soft boyish tie and wavy ( like a ruffle ) band.

Genevieve and Toni at bricks chose the latter which was half the price and twice the taste. She also said do the chan luu which I got on sale from her in fall 2008 and u wore to granddads funeral with the little petal shreds.

The shoes are the ” all black” ( I call them French whore) black and pale pink platforms which I will wear Wednesday night so I’ll have to meet you after this cocktail party which is at 61st and Terrace and over at 8:30. Are you still commuting from Lawrence and if not where are you living?

Don’t feel obligated to any of this, it was fun for everyone on your skilled team (which i am not one  of!)and I can take back the hat but do let me know how to drop off if you’d like.

Thanks for emailing me hon.
mother of the independent new assistant accountant executive in marketing at osborne and barr who also has always done everything for herself including fashion.  I’m so enjoying the moment and think you have a great team of stylists who know all our available wardrobe choices from 2006 on, shoes, dresses, jackets.

They said to call anytime!  1-316-681-0361 and ask for Genevieve, Toni, Marilyn, Gail, or Erin. 

Sent from my iPhone

Done!  Everything in red conveys tremendous satisfaction and love. 

le sketch du jour: June 4, 1980. le Grand Palais. Paris, France.

by admin

drawing, le Grand Palais. Right bank of Seine. Paris, France. by Paula Graves

Le Grand Palais is located on the right bank of the Seine as seen in this map of my running route in Paris. It is across the way and east a bit of the Eiffel Tower, and just west of the Place de la Concorde, the Tuileries, and the Louvre. This was the west leg of my no-brainer running route (where I would not get lost) when I lived at the Hotel Cayré on Boulevard Raspail.

Paula's running route with Grand Palais to left of Tuileries Gardens in light green.

Here's the aerial. right to left: Petit Palais, Grand Palais, Pont d'Alexandre spanning Seine.

It was constructed in 1897 of iron and steel with a glass barrel-vault and was one of the last buildings of this type inspired by the Crystal Palace in London, for the Exposition of 1851. These glass and steel structures were necessary for large gatherings of people before the age of electricity.

Crystal Palace, London. 185l.

History

The left wing has been a science museum since 1937, the south wing is occupied by the University of Paris IV, and there is a planetarium which is one of the first of its kind.

The construction of le Grand Palais began in 1897, following the demo of the Palace of Industry, in preparation for the Universal Exposition of 1900. This project also included an adjacent building, le Petit Palais, and le Pont d’Alexandre III which many consider to be the most beautiful and is definitely the most opulent bridge in Paris. But I won’t digress into bridges…

It is a Beaux Arts building with a formal floor plan but used contemporary innovations of the glass vault, iron and light steel framing, and reinforced concrete.

Its original purpose was to house the great artistic events of the city of Paris. I think it is interesting that this project was awarded to four architects, Henri Deglane, Albert Louvet, Albert Thomas and Charles Girault each with a separate are of responsibility. Not big famous names that are particularly memorable to the masses, comme moi, but a great display of teamwork in design, often a feat in itself.

There are a number of allegorical statue groups including work by sculptors Paul Gasq, Camille Lefèvre, Alfred Boucher, Alphonse-Amédée Cordonnier and Raoul Verlet. The two statue groupings on the pylons are the Champs-Élysées side depicting Immortality prevailing over Time and the one on the Seine side of Harmony triumphing over Discord. [I can’t find big enough images and I get them mixed up, but one is a woman in gown and another has a penis and they are both standing over fallen figures. So, I’m pretty sure the Immortality is the man and the Harmony is the woman].

Statue groupings surrounding le Grand Palais.

Later Function

After the Exposition, the palace was the site of different kinds of shows in addition to the intended art exhibitions from a riding competition (1901 to 1957) but were mainly dedicated to innovation and modernity: the automobile, aviation, household appliances…think “home show” until 1947. The first major Matisse retrospective after his death was held at the Grand Palais in 1970 and was an incredible success.

Problems, or should we say in the field, issues and challenges to address.

The structure itself was problematic from the start, mainly as a result of subsidence caused by a drop in the water table. The builders attempted to compensate for this subsidence by sinking supporting posts down to firmer soil so as not to delay construction, but measures were only partially successful. A show about locomotives and horseshow runoff also took their toll on the space. Differential rates of expansion and contraction between cast iron and steel allowed water to enter and corrode until a glass ceiling panel fell in 1993, and it was not fully reopened until 2007.

I think it’s interesting that the Grand Palais has a major police station in the basement which helps protect the exhibits on show in the Galeries National and the “salons” (picture spaces) of la Société Nationale des Beaux Arts, Salon d’Automne, and Salon Comparaisons. I mean, hey, the Nelson has guards and the Duane Hanson Guard which I found equally frightening in my younger days, but not a real cops headquarters for art.

Trivia

For the fashionistas, Chanel hosts many of its fashion shows here.

For the sabreurs, it was host of the 2010 Fencing Championships.

And for the WWI & II aficionados

The Palais served as a military hospital during World War I, employing local artists that had not deployed to the front to decorate hospital rooms or to make moulds for prosthetic limbs.

The Nazis used the Palais as a truck depot and for two Nazi propaganda exhibitions. The Parisian resistance used as headquarters during the Liberation of Paris. On August 23, 1944, a peace officer fired on the advancing Germans from a window and the Germans responded with a tank attack on the Palais which ignited hay set up for a circus show and two days of black smoke severely damaged the building [those Frenchman…always keep the circus going while you’re resisting the Germans…:)].

Et, c’est tout! C’est merveilleuse. At least, run by!

 

le sketch du jour: July 4th, 1980. Beaubourg, Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, d’Estaing, some politics.

by admin

Centre Georges Pompidou, former meat district, Paris.

The Pompidou Center was a brand new building designed by architects Renzo Piano (Italian, Milan)and Richard Rogers (British, Yale) in 1980 when I was in Paris. It was one of many projects by Valéry Giscard d’Estaing. The complex, an Art Museum, is in the Beaubourg area of the 4th arrondissement of Paris. It is near les halles (the former meat market area), rue montorgueil (where hip Parisians shop, eat, are seen…there’s a Monet painting of this street) and the Marais (first wealthy planned urban shopping and dwelling, Place des Vosges which was mentioned in sketchbook on July 1st. The goal of this museum is very egalitarian, to bring in everyone, even those who would never go to an art museum. This is so different than so many other museums in Paris where I would generalize to say that beyond the tourist, the visitor already feels some degree of appreciation of art.

First, a word about le Centre Georges Pompidou, aka Beauborg. If you really want the architect’s intellectual discussion, here ’tis. But bear with me, if you are working in the field of architecture or construction, it’s useless.

The Photo of my angle from internet.

It was innovative in having services such as staircases, lifts, electrical power conduits and water pipes on the outside, leaving the inside open and uncluttered.

an excerpt from journal notes from 4 July 1980.

 

As you can see, I saw Pompidou Center commonly called “Beaubourg”. It is pretty exciting-it looks like a “big erector set” as Michael (my teacher from NYC and Parsons) said.  It is exciting because it is so big, so high-tech, and so different for this city.  People seem to really enjoy it because the square & inside of the center were packed.  Inside was a photography exhibit, an exhibit of old train cars, tents, paintings, Duane Hanson (people in car) – I think it was “leisure activities,” a restaurant on the roof, a museum in the majority of theh building, and an escalator that takes you up through that clear tunnel to the top.  I did all, but none of the museum, and I was there for 2 1/2 hours.  

 

In the square were bagpipes, mimes, dancers, beggars, some religious group, and a man with chaings aound him that passed around a bucket for money.  There was also a belly dancer.  Definitely a must of things to do in Paris, but it does take a whole afternoon. 

And here’s some politics about France if anyone cares. 

Beaubourg was initiated under Pompidou, but under d’Estaing’s leadership was completed along with Valéry’s other far-reaching infrastructure projects, the TGV and the turn towards nuclear power as France’s main energy source. He suffered from the economic downturn from the ’73 energy crisis marking the end of the “30 glorious years after World War II.” Official discourse stated that the “end of the tunnel was near”.

A bit of background, he was a centre-right politician and liberal on social issues in the Catholic country of divorce, contraception, and abortion. He was opposed by Mitterand, of the newly-unified left, and from a rising Jacques Chirac who resurrected Gaullis (with whom d’Estaing had broken ranks) on a right-wing opposition line and was not re-elected after his tenure in ’81.  He supported the United States of Europe and the later EU.

One quote of his in particular, from an article he wrote for Le Monde[10] and published in that newspaper on 15 June 2007, that “public opinion will be led to adopt, without knowing it, the proposals we dare not present to them directly”, was consistently highlighted by “No” campaigners (anti EU) as evidence of d’Estaing’s alleged agenda to fool the European public into his proposals. While the quote is accurate, it was part of a critique, taken out of context, of a suggestion made by some unnamed persons. In truth, he went on to reject this course of action by saying, “This approach of ‘divide and ratify’ is clearly unacceptable. Perhaps it is a good exercise in presentation. But it would confirm to European citizens the notion that European construction is a procedure organised behind their backs by lawyers and diplomats.”

He was a a teacher in Montréal in ’48, graduated from École Polytechnique and the École national d’administration from ’49-’51, worked with the Tax and Revenue Service, joined staff of Prime Minister Faure in ’56, sec’y of Finance from ’59-’62, he supported the winning candidate Georges Pompidou and returned to the Ministry of Economy and Finance, and in ’74 at age 48, he was elected to President,In 1974, he was elected President of France at 48, the third youngest president in French history, after Louis Napoleon Bonaparte and Jean Casimir-Perioer. He promised “change in continuity”. He made clear his desire to introduce various reforms and modernise French society, which was an important part of his presidency.

And, he was an elegant, articulate man of economics, seemingly free of sexual scandal (a little minor diamond smuggling liaison accusation, but we have money issues in America, too). Pretty amazing for a French politician. 

 

Accosting young Frenchmen in Kansas…

by admin

I’m kind of doing payback for the Frenchmen that bothered me the summer of ’80 in France. The Italo-French Architect in the Louvre who admired my sketches, the man from Marseilles who followed me off the subway, the curly-headed copain who nuded me in the auberge laundry room.

Now, if  I hear un peu de l’accent français, je saute et je parle.  So this was my first subject…..

Faridj et Paule, Latteland. Plaza, KC.

I found this jeune homme speaking on his cell au bas de l’escalier at The Palace Theatre on the Plaza. Faridj Air is actually Berber (Northwest Africa, primarily arabic) of origin, but grew up in Paris. His (wife) and mother of his child are from Wichita where she lives with their son on the Plaza in KC. Thus, he wants to spend more time in ol’ Possum Trot to be with his son.  But, he caters private parties and lives in New York. When in Kansas City, he also serves a client down in Houston.

He was also doing an event for an artist Patrick Courtois in NYC (Chelsea) over my birthday and there were many French people traveling to New York to attend, so he invited me to come.  Being a week’s notice and I just met the garçon, I thought it premature to attend as well expensive at the last minute, but perhaps in a near future life I could live with such abandon.  He put me on the phone with Patrick Courtois so that I might hear l’accent français d’un homme de Marseilles, in the south of France.  It is quite different, more earthy and guttural but still sec-zee’.

Faridj has many interesting friends from France and beyond. He has another business as a middleman with a group that exports products such as what I would call “elite olive oils” sold in very very specialty food markets, each produced on local farms.  As you can imagine, the packaging, brochure about the people and place, and the included pour spout is everything and very well-done.  As it must be for a $12 3 oz. can of olive oil…maybe for my purse? Then again, that could be a mess.

So, might point is that he gets it with my website. Or at least the part that has to do with history, place, buildings, people, products, and food. Many of his connections live in French countryside producing food on their land in small family businesses, they invest loving hands in historic French farmhouses for guest travelers, and they make art.  They appreciate good food from native growers, fine wine or water, and moments with friends, new and old. I get that.